A day to come together

Three generations of the Brown family celebrate Reconciliation Day together. Pictured is Louise Brown, Nevada Brown, Justine Brown with Leilani Bosworth, Jed Brown and Kelsea Brown.

Three generations of the Brown family celebrate Reconciliation Day together. Pictured is Louise Brown, Nevada Brown, Justine Brown with Leilani Bosworth, Jed Brown and Kelsea Brown.

THREE generations of the Brown family joined together to celebrate Reconciliation Day on Tuesday, May 27.

Reconciliation Day is a very important time for local indigenous women Louise, Nevada and Justine Brown.

Louise emphasised the importance of reaching out to both indigenous and non-indigenous communities during this time.

"We want all Australians to take part in our journey because it's not just ours, it's all Australians. So come on the journey with us and learn about the oldest culture in the world," she said.

"Reconciliation has changed slowly but hopefully, we'll get there. It's going to take a little bit longer, it's hard thing for non-Aboriginal people to all digest in one day. As they come along and hear about reconciliation each year, they'll learn."

Louise's daughter, Nevada Brown, 30, said she felt proud to be part of her home town's Reconciliation Day march.

As a child, she said they celebrated NAIDOC Week while Reconcilaition Week has only been around the last few years.

"It definitely has changed since I was a school kid. This time for me, as a child, wasn't really celebrated. I grew up with a lot of prejudice and racism," she said.

"So for the next generation I want Reconciliation Day to mean having more positive people about and being together as one.

"Reconcilation Day to me means coming together and not forgetting the past but remembering it and moving forward together."

Nevada's 20-year-old niece, Justine Brown, said she is eager to learn from her elders and share that knowledge with the wider community.

"It's extremely important not just for Indigenous but non-Indigenous people to learn about our traditions and culture. When events like this happen, it's a way to show people our traditions and customs," she said.

"I want to pass on the knowledge of my own culture as well as what has happened in the past and what has put in place, so it doesn't happen again.

"Reconciliation is about not forgetting our past and moving forward."

Related stories: Reconciliation Day in Queanbeyan | Gallery

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