Playing a supporter's role

As we approach the 150th anniversary of the Queanbeyan Cricket Club, The Queanbeyan Age takes a look back at the incredible history behind the baggy blue cap.

As we approach the 150th anniversary of the Queanbeyan Cricket Club, The Queanbeyan Age takes a look back at the incredible history behind the baggy blue cap.

As we approach the 150th anniversary of the Queanbeyan Cricket Club, The Queanbeyan Age takes a look back at the incredible history behind the baggy blue cap.

 THE passage of time offers individuals of all sports the chance to think back and really take stock of the factors that influenced their sporting life.

If cricketers are fair dinkum and genuine, there’s no doubt their time in the middle was impacted substantially by the incredibly important support network that is often titled the ‘Cricket Widow’. 

It might be their wife or partner, their Mum, their girlfriend or their sister but it is the support provided by these amazing ladies that can make or break the cricketer’s life. 

In days gone by there would be afternoon tea or lunches with scones and jam, homemade sandwiches or fresh cakes still warm from the oven.  

Freshly pressed flannels, starched and crisp, boiled, soaked and scrubbed to remove the previous games memory and worn proudly the players.  

Then there was the social life where players would sit idly talking through every shot, every missed catch or opportunity or the six dispatched over ‘cow’ corner.

Meanwhile, the ladies would wait patiently, mingling with their new cricket friends before stumps was called on the after match function and it was home time. 

Some will remember cricket matches with fondness, lifetime friends being made and time to share with family while watching kids grow up to be teenagers. Boys mimicking their dads and brothers pining to be the next Queanbeyan first grade champion. 

For others the memories are not as appealing. Memories of long periods without their husband or boyfriend or son, of money poured from bank accounts to fund, equipment, representative trips and the like. 

As time moved on the role of the ‘Cricket Widow’ has evolved but is no less important. 

Mums are still endlessly taking kids to training, washing whites, making lunches and constantly funding repairs to broken windows as backyard matches move from old taped up tennis balls to a shiny new, rock-hard Kookaburra after Santa has arrived.  

They wipe away the tears when the little fella is run out following a dodgy call from their mate.

They are always there watching the ducks, the dropped catches and living the successes and losses.  Whether it’s the kids or grandkids there is always work to be done, support to be provided and the next cricket match is prepare for.

And deep down, there is no doubt that cricketers at clubs like the Bluebags right across Australia treasure everything their wives, girlfriends, mums and grandmothers have done for them throughout their careers.

It is only a tick over two months until the Queanbeyan District Cricket Club holds the 150th Anniversary weekend celebrations.  

The celebrations, to be held February 22-24, promise to be a wonderful chance for players from across many eras to be able to catch up with friends, share reflections of past performances.

It will also provide a chance for the legends of yesteryear to mingle with the current crop of young players whom look to their more senior cricketers for inspiration and guidance. 

www.queanbeyancricket.com 

Next week the Snick will have a chat with former Club President and first grade premiership player, Rod Winchester and ask his thoughts on his days at the helm of the Bluebags. 

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